• Booting from USB stick

    From Michael F. Stemper@mstemper@gmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 08:20:15 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    I just tried booting to Ubuntu from a USB stick, but it goes directly
    from blank screen to the Windows background image and a Windows login
    prompt. I am never asked if I want to boot from the stick.

    The stick is definitely recognized, because after logging in to the
    box, I can see it, and can even see the two EFI files on it.

    Is there some magic moment where I can push the right key and make it
    boot from the stick? When is that moment, and which key is right?

    Or, if somebody here is familiar with Windows, is there a way once
    I'm logged in to say "reboot from this"?

    Thanks for any help.

    --
    Michael F. Stemper
    The name of the story is "A Sound of Thunder".
    It was written by Ray Bradbury. You're welcome.
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  • From Adrian Caspersz@email@here.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 14:47:05 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 24/02/2021 14:20, Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    What color is it?

    Do you fire it up when the screen is pointing east, or west?

    --
    Adrian C
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From jjb@invalid@invalid.nl to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 16:20:32 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 24-02-2021 15:47, Adrian Caspersz wrote:
    On 24/02/2021 14:20, Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    What color is it?

    Do you fire it up when the screen is pointing east, or west?


    To start with, you have to really shutdown windows. Normally it just hibernates.
    Secondly, in Control Panel is (under Advanced Options) the possibility
    to boot into BIOS. From there you should be able to boot the USB stick.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Paul@nospam@needed.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 10:25:36 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    I just tried booting to Ubuntu from a USB stick, but it goes directly
    from blank screen to the Windows background image and a Windows login
    prompt. I am never asked if I want to boot from the stick.

    The stick is definitely recognized, because after logging in to the
    box, I can see it, and can even see the two EFI files on it.

    Is there some magic moment where I can push the right key and make it
    boot from the stick? When is that moment, and which key is right?

    Or, if somebody here is familiar with Windows, is there a way once
    I'm logged in to say "reboot from this"?

    Thanks for any help.


    In Windows 10, disable Fast Startup.

    What is happening, is the machine is in a hibernate
    kind of state, and hibernation recovery takes priority
    over boot choice. There are state bits in the Southbridge
    that track what is going on. (Removal of all power
    will clear these, which is another way to try to fix it.
    But it's not necessarily all that easy to do, either.
    Don't waste time on trying to do it this way.)

    Once Fast Startup is disabled, the machine enters normal
    shutdown (S5) state and reboot gives access to BIOS
    functions again (<Del> or F8 on Asus, F2 or F12 on some
    other machines).

    None of the following is particularly easy for a person who has
    no interest in Windows 10. A power user could do these.

    https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4189-turn-off-fast-startup-windows-10-a.html

    OPTION ONE
    To Turn On or Off Fast Startup in System Settings

    OPTION TWO
    To Turn On or Off Fast Startup using a BAT file

    OPTION THREE
    Enable or Disable to Require Fast Startup in Local Group Policy Editor

    OPTION FOUR
    Enable or Disable to Require Fast Startup using a REG file

    *******

    My way to do that, is right-click Start, then Run, then

    powercfg /h off

    and that kills two birds at once. What that does, is disable
    hibernation and removes hiberfil.sys (the hiberfile). With no
    space to store a warm Windows 10 kernel, Fast Startup it then thwarted.

    If you want to know the OS release, it's Start : Run : then

    winver

    Paul
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  • From Bobbie Sellers@bliss@mouse-potato.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 07:35:22 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 2/24/21 7:25 AM, Paul wrote:
    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    I just tried booting to Ubuntu from a USB stick, but it goes directly
    from blank screen to the Windows background image and a Windows login
    prompt. I am never asked if I want to boot from the stick.

    The stick is definitely recognized, because after logging in to the
    box, I can see it, and can even see the two EFI files on it.

    Is there some magic moment where I can push the right key and make it
    boot from the stick? When is that moment, and which key is right?

    Or, if somebody here is familiar with Windows, is there a way once
    I'm logged in to say "reboot from this"?

    Thanks for any help.


    In Windows 10, disable Fast Startup.

    What is happening, is the machine is in a hibernate
    kind of state, and hibernation recovery takes priority
    over boot choice. There are state bits in the Southbridge
    that track what is going on. (Removal of all power
    will clear these, which is another way to try to fix it.
    But it's not necessarily all that easy to do, either.
    Don't waste time on trying to do it this way.)

    Once Fast Startup is disabled, the machine enters normal
    shutdown (S5) state and reboot gives access to BIOS
    functions again (<Del> or F8 on Asus, F2 or F12 on some
    other machines).

    None of the following is particularly easy for a person who has
    no interest in Windows 10. A power user could do these.

    https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4189-turn-off-fast-startup-windows-10-a.html


    OPTION ONE
    To Turn On or Off Fast Startup in System Settings

    OPTION TWO
    To Turn On or Off Fast Startup using a BAT file

    OPTION THREE
    Enable or Disable to Require Fast Startup in Local Group Policy Editor

    OPTION FOUR
    Enable or Disable to Require Fast Startup using a REG file

    *******

    My way to do that, is right-click Start, then Run, then

       powercfg /h off

    and that kills two birds at once. What that does, is disable
    hibernation and removes hiberfil.sys (the hiberfile). With no
    space to store a warm Windows 10 kernel, Fast Startup it then thwarted.

    If you want to know the OS release, it's Start : Run : then

       winver

         Paul

    And while you are in BIOS turn off Secure Boot!
    You can look around and probably find a Boot Order and
    a one time Boot menu setting. These let you prioritize
    whether it tries to boot from Hard Disk, DVD/CD or Flash
    Drive.

    bliss
    --
    bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 09:13:11 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    You didn't give us enough info for guidance; for example, we don't know
    what kind (brand, model no) of computer it is nor what v. of Windows.
    Those matter because it helps to guide how to get it to boot from USB.

    I will assume Win10 for starters.

    Start/ (type in System Information)/ Click that app/ select System Summary

    Find system manufacturer and system model.

    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 09:33:22 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Mike Easter wrote:
    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    You didn't give us enough info for guidance; for example, we don't know
    what kind (brand, model no) of computer it is nor what v. of Windows.
    Those matter because it helps to guide how to get it to boot from USB.

    I will assume Win10 for starters.

    If Win7:

    Start/ type dxdiag/ click dxdiag.exe

    On the page of the system tab, there are lines for system manufacturer
    and for system model.

    The info you get this way isn't 'perfect'.

    For examples: on my Win10 Thinkpad x131e, I get Lenovo 3374A14 and on a
    system I built starting from a MSI mobo I get MSI MS-7891.

    I like the info I get from inxi under linux better, but that will have
    to wait until you get the Ub booted :-)


    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Michael F. Stemper@mstemper@gmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 12:25:34 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 24/02/2021 09.20, jjb wrote:
    On 24-02-2021 15:47, Adrian Caspersz wrote:
    On 24/02/2021 14:20, Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    What color is it?

    Do you fire it up when the screen is pointing east, or west?


    To start with, you have to really shutdown windows. Normally it just hibernates.

    Pulling the plug will fix that problem, right?

    Secondly, in Control Panel is (under Advanced Options) the possibility
    to boot into BIOS. From there you should be able to boot the USB stick.

    Sounded like just what the doctor ordered. Unfortunately, when I found
    "Control Panel", the menu went from "Administrative Tools" to"AutoPlay".
    I assume that this is because my identity doesn't have the Windows
    equivalent of sudo privileges.


    --
    Michael F. Stemper
    There's no "me" in "team". There's no "us" in "team", either.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Michael F. Stemper@mstemper@gmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 12:27:38 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 24/02/2021 11.13, Mike Easter wrote:
    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    You didn't give us enough info for guidance; for example, we don't know
    what kind (brand, model no) of computer it is nor what v. of Windows.
    Those matter because it helps to guide how to get it to boot from USB.

    I did not know that.

    I will assume Win10 for starters.

    Yup.

    Start/ (type in System Information)/ Click that app/ select System Summary

    Find system manufacturer and system model.

    HP Pavilion Desktop TP01-0xxx

    AMD Ryzen
    (There's more after Ryzen. Is that also needed?)


    --
    Michael F. Stemper
    There's no "me" in "team". There's no "us" in "team", either.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Paul@nospam@needed.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 13:34:52 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Mike Easter wrote:
    Mike Easter wrote:
    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    Somebody loaned me a computer. Unfortunately, it has Windows, with
    no applications other than a browser.

    You didn't give us enough info for guidance; for example, we don't
    know what kind (brand, model no) of computer it is nor what v. of
    Windows. Those matter because it helps to guide how to get it to boot
    from USB.

    I will assume Win10 for starters.

    If Win7:

    Start/ type dxdiag/ click dxdiag.exe

    On the page of the system tab, there are lines for system manufacturer
    and for system model.

    The info you get this way isn't 'perfect'.

    For examples: on my Win10 Thinkpad x131e, I get Lenovo 3374A14 and on a system I built starting from a MSI mobo I get MSI MS-7891.

    I like the info I get from inxi under linux better, but that will have
    to wait until you get the Ub booted :-)

    If you're held hostage, according to description,
    that's all we need to know.

    Winver can give some release info (similar to /etc/lsb-release in a way).

    Win7 doesn't have Fast Startup (Windows kernel hibernation).

    Win8 and Win10 could do it.

    The problem with the "Settings Panel" GUI approach
    to doing the necessary change, is at least on Windows 10,
    it's a rolling release, and the panel may no longer
    look like the pictures.

    Whereas

    powercfg /? # See the available powercfg options

    powercfg /h off # disable hibernation, remove hiberfil.sys

    that ensures there is no place to put a hibernated kernel,
    and the "No choice for you at BIOS level" behavior will stop.

    You can check the root of C: and see that the hiberfil.sys is gone.
    This sort of thing. The reason for command line again, is the
    stupid default settings are not conducive to forensic purpose.

    dir c: # list regular items

    dir /ah c: # list hidden items

    dir /? # more info

    Interacting at the registry level with the ACPI system
    can be pretty daunting, as there are a couple hundred registry
    entries that use GUIDs for identification, and it's not
    a good place to learn registry stuff particularly. Even if an
    alternate method isn't as good, I'd sooner do it that alternate
    way, then mess with that particular section of registry.
    But there is detailed control, if you have the time and
    energy to look up that topic.

    And as far as Microsoft goes, in design, powercfg is
    an unusually useful utility for them.

    Paul
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Feb 24 11:06:05 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    HP Pavilion Desktop TP01-0xxx

    This is a series of articles which take you to the BIOS where you can
    solve the problems about the type of bootup which have been described by others here., that is, getting rid of fast start, secure boot, and I
    also like legacy instead of UEFI, but that change isn't necessary for
    all linux booting.

    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c00364979 HP PCs - Configuring
    the Boot Order in the System BIOS

    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/bph07110 HP Desktop PCs - BIOS
    Setup Utility Information and Menu Options

    Then open the section on Storage menu where the boot options are.

    Some BIOS give you the option to provide a boot menu with an F key on
    startup.

    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From uglybastard@hotmail.com@"uglybastard@hotmail.com" to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Feb 26 00:57:04 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 24-02-2021 20:06, Mike Easter wrote:
    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    HP Pavilion Desktop TP01-0xxx

    This is a series of articles which take you to the BIOS where you can
    solve the problems about the type of bootup which have been described by >others here., that is, getting rid of fast start, secure boot, and I
    also like legacy instead of UEFI, but that change isn't necessary for
    all linux booting.

    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c00364979 HP PCs - Configuring
    the Boot Order in the System BIOS

    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/bph07110 HP Desktop PCs - BIOS
    Setup Utility Information and Menu Options

    Then open the section on Storage menu where the boot options are.

    Some BIOS give you the option to provide a boot menu with an F key on >startup.
    Vote up!

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Michael F. Stemper@mstemper@gmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Mon Mar 1 15:41:14 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 24/02/2021 13.06, Mike Easter wrote:
    Michael F. Stemper wrote:
    HP Pavilion Desktop TP01-0xxx

    This is a series of articles which take you to the BIOS where you can
    solve the problems about the type of bootup which have been described by others here., that is, getting rid of fast start, secure boot, and I
    also like legacy instead of UEFI, but that change isn't necessary for
    all linux booting.

    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c00364979  HP PCs - Configuring
    the Boot Order in the System BIOS

    Well, it took some poking and prodding, but I eventually got to the orange-brown screen. I just hope that I remember to undo the changes to
    boot order before I return it.

    Thanks for your help.

    --
    Michael F. Stemper
    Zechariah 7:10
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113