• Installing from live-USB-stick preserves or destroys existing userdata?

    From Janis Papanagnou@janis_papanagnou@hotmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Apr 7 10:37:54 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    After a non-successful upgrade from version 18 to 20 my system became inconsistent and doesn't boot anymore. To get access to the user data
    in the home directories I tried to access the system through a booted
    live system on an USB-stick. From that instance I see the directories
    but cannot enter them due to lacking access permissions of the live
    user. Switching to root or sudo seems impossible when a root password
    isn't available in the live-system context. Or am I missing an access
    option?

    As far as I see another option I have would be to install the system
    from the live version, but will the existing home directories be
    preserved or deleted in that process?

    Janis
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From jjb@invalid@invalid.nl to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Apr 7 11:11:01 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 07-04-2021 10:37, Janis Papanagnou wrote:
    After a non-successful upgrade from version 18 to 20 my system became inconsistent and doesn't boot anymore. To get access to the user data
    in the home directories I tried to access the system through a booted
    live system on an USB-stick. From that instance I see the directories
    but cannot enter them due to lacking access permissions of the live
    user. Switching to root or sudo seems impossible when a root password
    isn't available in the live-system context. Or am I missing an access
    option?

    As far as I see another option I have would be to install the system
    from the live version, but will the existing home directories be
    preserved or deleted in that process?

    Janis

    Open terminal, type"
    sudo su
    and press <Enter> if asked for a password. That should be all...

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Chris Elvidge@chris@mshome.net to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Apr 7 10:28:22 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 07/04/2021 09:37 am, Janis Papanagnou wrote:
    After a non-successful upgrade from version 18 to 20 my system became inconsistent and doesn't boot anymore. To get access to the user data
    in the home directories I tried to access the system through a booted
    live system on an USB-stick. From that instance I see the directories
    but cannot enter them due to lacking access permissions of the live
    user. Switching to root or sudo seems impossible when a root password
    isn't available in the live-system context. Or am I missing an access
    option?

    I think you're finding walls where no walls exist - you do not need a
    root password for sudo, only your user password.

    I can't speak directly for Ubuntu, but booting the iso of Linux Mint
    Debian Edition allows "sudo -i" in a terminal to get root with the
    default autologin user mint - no password required.


    As far as I see another option I have would be to install the system
    from the live version, but will the existing home directories be
    preserved or deleted in that process?

    Janis



    --
    Chris Elvidge
    England
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From wicklowham@wicklowham.nospam@rfburns.eu to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Apr 7 14:46:02 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 07/04/2021 09:37, Janis Papanagnou wrote:
    After a non-successful upgrade from version 18 to 20 my system became inconsistent and doesn't boot anymore. To get access to the user data
    in the home directories I tried to access the system through a booted
    live system on an USB-stick. From that instance I see the directories
    but cannot enter them due to lacking access permissions of the live
    user. Switching to root or sudo seems impossible when a root password
    isn't available in the live-system context. Or am I missing an access
    option?

    As far as I see another option I have would be to install the system
    from the live version, but will the existing home directories be
    preserved or deleted in that process?

    Janis

    When a new version comes out ,I always first save the home directory
    with all its files and subsequently install the new version from scratch
    .That has never failed me .
    An option is to have and keep the Home directory on a separate partition ,although I have never done that.

    Frank in County Wicklow - Ireland
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Dirk T. Verbeek@dverbeek@xs4all.nl to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Apr 7 16:25:39 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Op 07-04-2021 om 15:46 schreef wicklowham:
    On 07/04/2021 09:37, Janis Papanagnou wrote:
    After a non-successful upgrade from version 18 to 20 my system became
    inconsistent and doesn't boot anymore. To get access to the user data
    in the home directories I tried to access the system through a booted
    live system on an USB-stick. From that instance I see the directories
    but cannot enter them due to lacking access permissions of the live
    user. Switching to root or sudo seems impossible when a root password
    isn't available in the live-system context. Or am I missing an access
    option?

    As far as I see another option I have would be to install the system
    from the live version, but will the existing home directories be
    preserved or deleted in that process?

    Janis

    When a new version comes out ,I always first save the home directory
    with all its files and subsequently install the new version from scratch .That has never failed me .
    An option is to have and keep the Home directory on a separate partition ,although I have never done that.

    Frank    in County Wicklow  - Ireland

    I have my home directory and root on their own partitions.
    Yes I make a backup of /home (simple copy) before upgrading or more
    often doing a fresh install.
    During the install I have the root directory and partition reformatted
    and leave the /home alone, no formatting.
    Providing you use the same username and password all will work as
    before, in many years I've never had to revert to the backup.

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Janis Papanagnou@janis_papanagnou@hotmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 07:29:05 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 07.04.2021 11:11, jjb wrote:
    On 07-04-2021 10:37, Janis Papanagnou wrote:
    [...] Or am I missing an access option?

    Open terminal, type"
    sudo su
    and press <Enter> if asked for a password. That should be all...

    Right. I now have root access and I'm able to back up that formerly inaccessible user data. Thanks!

    Janis

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Janis Papanagnou@janis_papanagnou@hotmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 07:33:53 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 07.04.2021 11:28, Chris Elvidge wrote:
    On 07/04/2021 09:37 am, Janis Papanagnou wrote:
    [...] Or am I missing an access option?

    I think you're finding walls where no walls exist -

    Yeah, most likely. :-)

    you do not need a root password for sudo, only your user password.

    The problem was that my user (id and password) was not available
    in the live-system context.

    I can't speak directly for Ubuntu, but booting the iso of Linux Mint
    Debian Edition allows "sudo -i" in a terminal to get root with the
    default autologin user mint - no password required.

    I tried the previous poster's suggestion "sudo su" and it worked
    also without password. So I'm okay for the moment. Thank you.

    Janis

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Janis Papanagnou@janis_papanagnou@hotmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 07:54:44 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 07.04.2021 15:46, wicklowham wrote:

    When a new version comes out ,I always first save the home directory
    with all its files and subsequently install the new version from scratch .That has never failed me .

    Well, the updates usually worked flawlessly. Just this upgrade failed.
    As usual I used, as with the update, the built-in automatism also for
    the upgrade. Didn't expect any issues. But the Chrome update required
    some 'snap' method, and that process just hung. - I think it is a bug
    that the system can get in an inconsistent state at that stage during
    a very long update process, so that a reboot will permanently fail.
    IMO it should build the new environment (long time scale), then switch
    to the new one (short time scale) while both versions still available;
    it would make the update more reliable. (And I thought that this would
    already be done that way; I'm puzzled.)

    An option is to have and keep the Home directory on a separate partition ,although I have never done that.

    On this system I used a standard installation, with just one hard disk,
    used the "default" file system, and no specific partitioning.

    On the other box, the one I primarily use, I have a more elaborated
    setup, with SSD and HDDs, multi-disk ZFS, backup devices, and a more
    sensible choice of and mapping to partitions.

    Janis

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Henry Crun@mike@rechtman.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 15:04:47 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 09/04/2021 8:54, Janis Papanagnou wrote:
    On 07.04.2021 15:46, wicklowham wrote:

    When a new version comes out ,I always first save the home directory
    with all its files and subsequently install the new version from scratch
    .That has never failed me .

    Well, the updates usually worked flawlessly. Just this upgrade failed.
    As usual I used, as with the update, the built-in automatism also for
    the upgrade. Didn't expect any issues. But the Chrome update required
    some 'snap' method, and that process just hung. - I think it is a bug
    that the system can get in an inconsistent state at that stage during
    a very long update process, so that a reboot will permanently fail.
    IMO it should build the new environment (long time scale), then switch
    to the new one (short time scale) while both versions still available;
    it would make the update more reliable. (And I thought that this would already be done that way; I'm puzzled.)

    An option is to have and keep the Home directory on a separate partition
    ,although I have never done that.

    On this system I used a standard installation, with just one hard disk,
    used the "default" file system, and no specific partitioning.

    On the other box, the one I primarily use, I have a more elaborated
    setup, with SSD and HDDs, multi-disk ZFS, backup devices, and a more
    sensible choice of and mapping to partitions.

    Janis


    The "Big Hammer" way of solving snap probles is removing snap.
    I found https://cialu.net/how-to-disable-and-remove-completely-snaps-in-ubuntu-linux/ to be useful.

    If you *really* need chromium, there is a way (which escapes my memory right now) of installing it on Ubuntu from a
    Debian repository. Anything else you have installed using snap can probably be installed using apt-get.

    --
    Mike R.
    Home: http://alpha.mike-r.com/
    QOTD: http://alpha.mike-r.com/qotd.php
    No Micro$oft products were used in the URLs above, or in preparing this message.
    Recommended reading: http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#before
    and: http://alpha.mike-r.com/jargon/T/top-post.html
    Missile address: N31.7624/E34.9691
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  • From Andrei Z.@no-email@invalid.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 16:37:29 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Henry Crun wrote:
    <snip>

    If you *really* need chromium, there is a way (which escapes my memory
    right now) of installing it on Ubuntu from a Debian repository. Anything else you have installed using snap can probably be installed using apt-get.

    Chromium Browser (Deb) Now Available to Install via Linux Mint 20
    Repository - UbuntuHandbook

    https://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2020/11/chromium-browser-deb-available-linux-mint-20/
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Janis Papanagnou@janis_papanagnou@hotmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sat Apr 10 18:12:54 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 09.04.2021 14:04, Henry Crun wrote:
    On 09/04/2021 8:54, Janis Papanagnou wrote:

    Well, the updates usually worked flawlessly. Just this upgrade failed.
    As usual I used, as with the update, the built-in automatism also for
    the upgrade. Didn't expect any issues. But the Chrome update required
    some 'snap' method, and that process just hung. [...]

    The "Big Hammer" way of solving snap probles is removing snap.
    I found https://cialu.net/how-to-disable-and-remove-completely-snaps-in-ubuntu-linux/ to be useful.

    You confirm a statement about 'snap' that I've already heard elsewhere.
    But I wasn't even aware that I installed that 'snap' thing. Thanks for
    the link, it's useful, and after my recovery I'm going to purge 'snap'
    if I still find it in my original re-installed system.

    If you *really* need chromium, there is a way (which escapes my memory
    right now) of installing it on Ubuntu from a Debian repository. Anything
    else you have installed using snap can probably be installed using apt-get.

    I don't use Chromium. I may have installed it to check it out (don't
    recall at the moment) in times where Firefox slowed down, to see whether
    other software performs better. But I certainly don't "need" 'snap'.

    Janis

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113