• OT: Bad wifi in room. Ethernet cable there but wifi printer has nocable port.

    From bilsch01@nobody@always.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 13:45:20 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    I want to put a small laser printer in a room far from our Comcast dual
    band 802.11ac 'gateway'. The Comcast unit is called an ARRIS TG1682G.
    There is an ethernet cable running from the ARRIS to the far room. All
    the new printers seem to be wifi only - with perhaps a USB port. One
    option I can think is hang some kind of wifi 'repeater' on the cable.
    Also I see something like a TP-N300 range extender (TLWA850RE)that
    powers from the room AC receptacle. It sounds like the range extender functions like a repeater. I worry there will be confusion/conflict
    assigning the printer specifically to this new gizmo as opposed to it sometimes connecting to the weak wifi signal from the ARRIS. Also
    complication with our PCs trying to connect to the new gizmo instead of
    the ARRIS where they belong. Rather than just buying something and
    blundering away, I hope someone here can give me some ideas from
    experience they have.

    TIA. Bill S.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 14:18:26 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    bilsch01 wrote:
    I want to put a small laser printer in a room far from our Comcast dual
    band 802.11ac 'gateway'. The Comcast unit is called an ARRIS TG1682G.
    There is an ethernet cable running from the ARRIS to the far room. All
    the new  printers seem to be wifi only - with perhaps a USB port. One option I can think is hang some kind of wifi 'repeater' on the cable.
    Also I see something like a TP-N300 range extender (TLWA850RE)that
    powers from the room AC receptacle. It sounds like the range extender functions like a repeater. I worry there will be confusion/conflict assigning the printer specifically to this new gizmo as opposed to it sometimes connecting to the weak wifi signal from the ARRIS. Also complication with our PCs trying to connect to the new gizmo instead of
    the ARRIS where they belong. Rather than just buying something and blundering away, I hope someone here can give me some ideas from
    experience they have.

    My router is in a too buried location to be a good wifi AP, but it is ethernetted to several devices nearby. I ethernetted an AP which is not
    far from the router and in a much better location and it is the
    connection for devices 'all over the place'.

    The AP device is 'multipurpose' - places which are selling them call it

    AirLink AP431w Super G 108Mbps Wireless Router Extender Repeater Bridge Gateway
    or
    AirLink 101 ap431 W 108 Mbps 802.11 g Wireless LAN Access Point

    and it is being sold for $28-36 new, free shipping.

    I'm surprised that it is that hard to find an ethernetted network
    printer. That would be my first choice if you don't already have a
    wifi-only printer.


    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From bilsch01@nobody@always.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Fri Apr 9 19:44:58 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 4/9/21 2:18 PM, Mike Easter wrote:
    bilsch01 wrote:
    I want to put a small laser printer in a room far from our Comcast
    dual band 802.11ac 'gateway'. The Comcast unit is called an ARRIS
    TG1682G. There is an ethernet cable running from the ARRIS to the far
    room. All the new  printers seem to be wifi only - with perhaps a USB
    port. One option I can think is hang some kind of wifi 'repeater' on
    the cable. Also I see something like a TP-N300 range extender
    (TLWA850RE)that powers from the room AC receptacle. It sounds like the
    range extender functions like a repeater. I worry there will be
    confusion/conflict assigning the printer specifically to this new
    gizmo as opposed to it sometimes connecting to the weak wifi signal
    from the ARRIS. Also complication with our PCs trying to connect to
    the new gizmo instead of the ARRIS where they belong. Rather than just
    buying something and blundering away, I hope someone here can give me
    some ideas from experience they have.

    My router is in a too buried location to be a good wifi AP, but it is ethernetted to several devices nearby.  I ethernetted an AP which is not far from the router and in a much better location and it is the
    connection for devices 'all over the place'.

    The AP device is 'multipurpose' - places which are selling them call it

    AirLink AP431w Super G 108Mbps Wireless Router Extender Repeater Bridge Gateway
    or
    AirLink 101 ap431 W 108 Mbps 802.11 g Wireless LAN Access Point

    and it is being sold for $28-36 new, free shipping.

    I'm surprised that it is that hard to find an ethernetted network
    printer.  That would be my first choice if you don't already have a wifi-only printer.


    I looked harder and found Xerox B210 printer with RJ45 jack. I think I
    might order one.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From bilou@bilou@sfr.fr to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sat Apr 10 10:27:29 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 09/04/2021 22:45, bilsch01 wrote:
    I want to put a small laser printer in a room far from our Comcast dual
    band 802.11ac 'gateway'. The Comcast unit is called an ARRIS TG1682G.
    There is an ethernet cable running from the ARRIS to the far room. All
    the new  printers seem to be wifi only - with perhaps a USB port. One option I can think is hang some kind of wifi 'repeater' on the cable.
    Also I see something like a TP-N300 range extender (TLWA850RE)that
    powers from the room AC receptacle. It sounds like the range extender functions like a repeater. I worry there will be confusion/conflict assigning the printer specifically to this new gizmo as opposed to it sometimes connecting to the weak wifi signal from the ARRIS. Also complication with our PCs trying to connect to the new gizmo instead of
    the ARRIS where they belong. Rather than just buying something and blundering away, I hope someone here can give me some ideas from
    experience they have.

    TIA.    Bill S.

    Ubuntu has a nice access point function.
    I use it to talk to mobile phones and tablets it should also work with printers.
    One nice thing is that if your Ubuntu is VPN protected the access point
    clients are too.
    Some Android TV boxes also have an access point function.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From bilsch01@nobody@always.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sat Apr 10 21:04:16 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 4/10/21 1:27 AM, bilou wrote:
    On 09/04/2021 22:45, bilsch01 wrote:
    I want to put a small laser printer in a room far from our Comcast
    dual band 802.11ac 'gateway'. The Comcast unit is called an ARRIS
    TG1682G. There is an ethernet cable running from the ARRIS to the far
    room. All the new  printers seem to be wifi only - with perhaps a USB
    port. One option I can think is hang some kind of wifi 'repeater' on
    the cable. Also I see something like a TP-N300 range extender
    (TLWA850RE)that powers from the room AC receptacle. It sounds like the
    range extender functions like a repeater. I worry there will be
    confusion/conflict assigning the printer specifically to this new
    gizmo as opposed to it sometimes connecting to the weak wifi signal
    from the ARRIS. Also complication with our PCs trying to connect to
    the new gizmo instead of the ARRIS where they belong. Rather than just
    buying something and blundering away, I hope someone here can give me
    some ideas from experience they have.

    TIA.    Bill S.

    Ubuntu has a nice access point function.

    Could you tell me more about Ubuntu"s AP function. Like how do I get
    into it?

    Thanks.

    I use it to talk to mobile phones and tablets it should also work with printers.
    One nice thing is that if your Ubuntu is VPN protected the access point clients are too.
    Some Android TV boxes also have an access point function.

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From bilou@bilou@sfr.fr to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Apr 11 15:12:08 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 11/04/2021 06:04, bilsch01 wrote:

    Could you tell me more about Ubuntu"s AP function. Like how do I get
    into it?

    The program I launch from GUI is called "Network Tools".
    I have no idea how to launch it from a terminal.
    (No thanks Ubuntu for this stupid behaviour)
    PS:I found that from a Gnome GUI terminal you must type "nettool"
    From there you choose the WIFI interface
    add one configuration with +
    define it as AP for access point
    give it a name
    choose channel
    choose security key
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Harold Stevens@wookie@fossa.localdomain to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Apr 11 10:16:58 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    In <6072f5aa$0$16199$426a74cc@news.free.fr> bilou:

    The program I launch from GUI is called "Network Tools".
    I have no idea how to launch it from a terminal.

    The CLI tool I use is nmtui (in the Network Manager package):

    sudo apt install network-manager

    The manpages, after install:

    man nmtui

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at att, dotted with net. * DO NOT SPAM IT. *
    I toss GoogleGroup (http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/).
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  • From bilou@bilou@sfr.fr to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Mon Apr 12 01:52:40 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 11/04/2021 17:16, Harold Stevens wrote:
    The CLI tool I use is nmtui (in the Network Manager package):

    sudo apt install network-manager

    The manpages, after install:

    man nmtui
    Many thanks.
    I just tried it and it seems to work.
    It even seems better than the GUI as it allowed me to create
    a new AP in the 5GHz band.

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Harold Stevens@wookie@limbo.localdomain to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Mon Apr 12 02:50:18 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    In <60738bc9$0$21614$426a34cc@news.free.fr> bilou:

    [Snip...]

    Many thanks.

    Certainly. :)

    a new AP in the 5GHz band

    It's a very handy tool. Caution: passwords seem to be cleartext
    by default (the "psk=" entry) in files (root-only access) under

    /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at att, dotted with net. * DO NOT SPAM IT. *
    I toss GoogleGroup (http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/).
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From ray@ray@zianet.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Mon Apr 12 09:38:49 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu


    TIA.    Bill S.

    So put a cheap wireless router in the same room and connected to the
    ethernet. It isn't rocket science and if you give the new wireless
    network a different name there won't be any conflict.

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Big Bad Bob@BigBadBob-at-mrp3-dot-com@testing.local to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Apr 14 02:30:39 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 2021-04-10 21:04, bilsch01 wrote:
    Could you tell me more about Ubuntu"s AP function. Like how do I get
    into it?

    man iwconfig
    man hostapd
    (you probably have to install the hostapd package for this to work)

    info on setting up an AP on an RPi using Raspbian https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/wireless/access-point-bridged.md

    at least SOME of that stuff (Raspbian-related) applies.

    Hopefully that will have enough info for ya, outside of setting up DHCP,
    DNS, routing, and/or anything else. [but if you bridge the wireless
    with the ethernet, routing would be transparent]

    But if you're going to use a NON-SYSTEMD-BASED Linux, like Devuan, it'll probably be easier.

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113