• Linux (Ubuntu) and 4K monitors

    From Dave@dboland9@protonmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Jun 2 10:02:30 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    All,

    I need a lot more screen real estate and have decided that a 4K monitor
    is my best option (not enough desk top space for multiple monitors).
    After a lot of Googling, it looks like support for 4K monitors under
    Linux (and most DE's) is spotty, and very little support for partial
    scaling (1.25x, 1.33x, 1.5x, etc.). It seems that the sweet spot for a
    27" 4K monitor (easiest to fit on my desk) is 1.25x.

    So, I have some questions for Linux users that have 4K monitors.

    1) What distribution and DE do you have and how well do you think it
    supports your 4K?

    2) What monitor, scaling setting, graphics card, and connection (USB,
    HDMI, etc.) do you have?

    3) What do you use your monitor for - text/software, video editing, photography, games, etc?

    4) Any thoughts for someone considering a 4K monitor?

    Thanks.
    Dave
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Wes Newell@wesnewell46@gmail.com to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Jun 2 09:50:14 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 6/2/21 9:02 AM, Dave wrote:
    Any thoughts for someone considering a 4K monitor?
    Complete waste imo. I run a 1080 27" and have to use a strong mag glass
    to see individual pixels on it. I've also got a 4k 55" and I use it at
    1080. At 2160 everything is so small, you have to zoom it in anyway. The
    human eye can't distinguish individual pixels that small. I'd think
    you'd need at least a 100" or more monitor to do so. 4k on a 27" is 163 ppi.

    --
    http://wesnewell.ddns.net
    https://github.com/wesnewell/Functionality
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Dirk T. Verbeek@dverbeek@xs4all.nl to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Jun 2 19:26:15 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Op 02-06-2021 om 16:50 schreef Wes Newell:
    On 6/2/21 9:02 AM, Dave wrote:
    Any thoughts for someone considering a 4K monitor?
    Complete waste imo. I run a 1080 27" and have to use a strong mag glass
    to see individual pixels on it. I've also got a 4k 55" and I use it at
    1080. At 2160 everything is so small, you have to zoom it in anyway. The human eye can't distinguish individual pixels that small. I'd think
    you'd need at least a 100" or more monitor to do so. 4k on a 27" is 163
    ppi.

    You better go to get a check up on your eyes.
    1080 is OK on an old 17", anything bigger you'd start noticing the pixels.
    For present day photography and video with many pixels camera's you sure
    need those screen pixels to check the quality.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Dirk T. Verbeek@dverbeek@xs4all.nl to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Jun 2 19:20:43 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Op 02-06-2021 om 16:02 schreef Dave:
    All,

    I need a lot more screen real estate and have decided that a 4K monitor
    is my best option (not enough desk top space for multiple monitors).
    After a lot of Googling, it looks like support for 4K monitors under
    Linux (and most DE's) is spotty, and very little support for partial
    scaling (1.25x, 1.33x, 1.5x, etc.).  It seems that the sweet spot for a
    27" 4K monitor (easiest to fit on my desk) is 1.25x.

    So, I have some questions for Linux users that have 4K monitors.

    1) What distribution and DE do you have and how well do you think it supports your 4K?

    2) What monitor, scaling setting, graphics card, and connection (USB,
    HDMI, etc.) do you have?

    3) What do you use your monitor for - text/software, video editing, photography, games, etc?

    4) Any thoughts for someone considering a 4K monitor?

    Thanks.
    Dave

    I run Kubuntu 20.04 on a Thinkpad W520 laptop with nVidia Quadro 1000M
    video.
    Attached to it via HDMI is a 27" 4K Dell monitor and it works fine.

    I use it mainly for photo editing and watching (HD) TV.
    But I've also done some text and presentation editing with two windows
    side by side.

    I don't see any reason to scale, it is always set to it's native resolution.
    If you feel the fonts are too small you can always change them or change
    the DPI.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From anton@anton@mips.complang.tuwien.ac.at (Anton Ertl) to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Jun 2 17:23:04 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Dave <dboland9@protonmail.com> writes:
    All,

    I need a lot more screen real estate and have decided that a 4K monitor
    is my best option (not enough desk top space for multiple monitors).
    After a lot of Googling, it looks like support for 4K monitors under
    Linux (and most DE's) is spotty, and very little support for partial
    scaling (1.25x, 1.33x, 1.5x, etc.). It seems that the sweet spot for a
    27" 4K monitor (easiest to fit on my desk) is 1.25x.

    So, I have some questions for Linux users that have 4K monitors.

    1) What distribution and DE do you have and how well do you think it >supports your 4K?

    I use a Debian-based LTSP system with a 32" 4K monitor, and it works
    fine. I run twm as window manager and use my favourite settings in
    xrdb (i.e., nothing you would consider a desktop environment).

    2) What monitor, scaling setting, graphics card, and connection (USB,
    HDMI, etc.) do you have?

    It's some Samsung monitor, there is no scaling setting, the graphics
    card is Intel graphics on a Gemini Lake board, and IIRC I use display
    port, or maybe HDMI.

    3) What do you use your monitor for - text/software, video editing, >photography, games, etc?

    text/software.

    4) Any thoughts for someone considering a 4K monitor?

    27" is too small:-)

    At home I am happy with a 30" 2560x1600 monitor. That's because some
    of my older software only supports the old-style bitmap fonts (not the
    newer faces), and they have only been designed for 75dpi and 100dpi
    displays, and there are no good bitmap fonts for 150-200dpi displays.
    But I expect that won't be a problem for you.

    - anton
    --
    M. Anton Ertl Some things have to be seen to be believed anton@mips.complang.tuwien.ac.at Most things have to be believed to be seen http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/home.html
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Aragorn@thorongil@telenet.be to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Jun 2 20:01:17 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 02.06.2021 at 19:26, Dirk T. Verbeek scribbled:

    Op 02-06-2021 om 16:50 schreef Wes Newell:
    On 6/2/21 9:02 AM, Dave wrote:
    Any thoughts for someone considering a 4K monitor?
    Complete waste imo. I run a 1080 27" and have to use a strong mag
    glass to see individual pixels on it. I've also got a 4k 55" and I
    use it at 1080. At 2160 everything is so small, you have to zoom it
    in anyway. The human eye can't distinguish individual pixels that
    small. I'd think you'd need at least a 100" or more monitor to do
    so. 4k on a 27" is 163 ppi.

    You better go to get a check up on your eyes.
    1080 is OK on an old 17", anything bigger you'd start noticing the
    pixels.

    I'm running 1920 x 1080 on a 27" here, and I'm not seeing any
    pixels. The only time I ever see them is when I bring up an episode
    from one of the old sci-fi series I have on my computer and enlarge the
    video player's window to make it somewhat viewable, because watching
    them in an 8 x 6 cm box on a 27" monitor is ridiculous.

    Over at the Manjaro forum, we've got loads of people who actually use
    scaling on their monitors because they can't read the text otherwise,
    even with 1920 x 1080 on monitors of various sizes. And Usenet is full
    of (by now slightly older) posts from people asking how to enlarge the
    console fonts on TFT monitors that have a far lower resolution.

    For present day photography and video with many pixels camera's you
    sure need those screen pixels to check the quality.

    You can always zoom such photos back to their natural resolution in any
    decent image viewer (e.g. Gwenview) or graphics suite (e.g. Gimp) for
    checking their quality.

    The whole thing reminds me of hardcore gamers complaining that the FPS
    drops back to 60, while the human eye (and brain) can only register 30
    FPS.

    --
    With respect,
    = Aragorn =

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Dirk T. Verbeek@dverbeek@xs4all.nl to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Wed Jun 2 22:28:09 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Op 02-06-2021 om 19:20 schreef Dirk T. Verbeek:
    Op 02-06-2021 om 16:02 schreef Dave:
    All,

    I need a lot more screen real estate and have decided that a 4K
    monitor is my best option (not enough desk top space for multiple
    monitors). After a lot of Googling, it looks like support for 4K
    monitors under Linux (and most DE's) is spotty, and very little
    support for partial scaling (1.25x, 1.33x, 1.5x, etc.).  It seems that
    the sweet spot for a 27" 4K monitor (easiest to fit on my desk) is 1.25x.

    So, I have some questions for Linux users that have 4K monitors.

    1) What distribution and DE do you have and how well do you think it
    supports your 4K?

    2) What monitor, scaling setting, graphics card, and connection (USB,
    HDMI, etc.) do you have?

    3) What do you use your monitor for - text/software, video editing,
    photography, games, etc?

    4) Any thoughts for someone considering a 4K monitor?

    Thanks.
    Dave

    I run Kubuntu 20.04 on a Thinkpad W520 laptop with nVidia Quadro 1000M video.
    Attached to it via HDMI is a 27" 4K Dell monitor and it works fine.

    I use it mainly for photo editing and watching (HD) TV.
    But I've also done some text and presentation editing with two windows
    side by side.

    I don't see any reason to scale, it is always set to it's native
    resolution.
    If you feel the fonts are too small you can always change them or change
    the DPI.

    Just for the sake of it I've set the monitor resolution to 1920x1080 and
    it works as should.
    Just the Hi-res wallpaper is losing some smoothness.
    Same at 1680x1050 and 2048x1152.
    (These are predefined resolutions in system settings)
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113