• A weak point in ubuntu 20.04

    From gamo@gamo@telecable.es to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 15:54:01 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu


    Hi there!

    The problem is that when I copy from a web page (ff) and
    try to paste in... LO or jed or... the paste option is over.
    The 'clipboard' was deleted in the change of programs.
    How do you solve that or avoid that???

    Best.


    --
    http://gamo.sdf-eu.org/
    perl -E 'say "I promise fun without limits. You can vote me.";'
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 06:59:30 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    gamo wrote:
    The problem is that when I copy from a web page (ff) and
    try to paste in... LO or jed or... the paste option is over.
    The 'clipboard' was deleted in the change of programs.
    How do you solve that or avoid that???

    I don't understand what you mean. Ub 20.04 has a 'conventional' clipboard.

    However, some webpages don't easily lend themselves to be copied and
    might require some kind of 'alternate' view of the text to copy it.

    Do you have some specific page in mind?

    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From gamo@gamo@telecable.es to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 18:32:04 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    El 6/6/21 a las 15:59, Mike Easter escribió:
    gamo wrote:
    The problem is that when I copy from a web page (ff) and
    try to paste in... LO or jed or... the paste option is over.
    The 'clipboard' was deleted in the change of programs.
    How do you solve that or avoid that???

    I don't understand what you mean.  Ub 20.04 has a 'conventional' clipboard.

    However, some webpages don't easily lend themselves to be copied and
    might require some kind of 'alternate' view of the text to copy it.

    Do you have some specific page in mind?


    https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Cynicism

    --
    http://gamo.sdf-eu.org/
    perl -E 'say "I promise fun without limits. You can vote me.";'
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Dirk T. Verbeek@dverbeek@xs4all.nl to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 18:28:48 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    It sounds to me like a problem with Firefox.
    This is a section from Slashdot:
    ---------------
    From the Department of Justice announcement:

    The ransomware informed victims that their computer was encrypted, and
    that they would need to purchase special software through a Bitcoin
    address controlled by the Trickbot Group to decrypt their files. In
    addition, Witte allegedly provided code to the Trickbot Group that
    monitored and tracked authorized users of the malware and developed
    tools and protocols to store stolen login credentials... Witte and her co-conspirators allegedly worked together to infect victim computers
    with the Trickbot malware designed to capture online banking login
    credentials and harvest other personal information, including credit
    card numbers, emails, passwords, dates of birth, social security numbers
    and addresses. Witte and others also allegedly captured login
    credentials and other stolen personal information to gain access to
    online bank accounts, execute unauthorized electronic funds transfers
    and launder the money through U.S. and foreign beneficiary accounts... ---------------

    The markup is not copied as usenet should not contain html
    Anything fancier would require PrtSc.

    In LO I also get the correct fonts.


    Op 06-06-2021 om 15:54 schreef gamo:



    Hi there!

    The problem is that when I copy from a web page (ff) and
    try to paste in... LO or jed or... the paste option is over.
    The 'clipboard' was deleted in the change of programs.
    How do you solve that or avoid that???

    Best.



    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 10:14:53 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    gamo wrote:
    Mike Easter escribió:
    gamo wrote:
    The problem is that when I copy from a web page (ff) and
    try to paste in... LO or jed or... the paste option is over.
    The 'clipboard' was deleted in the change of programs.
    How do you solve that or avoid that???

    Do you have some specific page in mind?

    https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Cynicism

    That page text copies just fine for pasting from the clipboard.

    In Ffx I also sometimes use the Reader view or View/ Page style/ No
    style for some things I do.

    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From gamo@gamo@telecable.es to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 19:43:07 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    El 6/6/21 a las 18:28, Dirk T. Verbeek escribió:
    It sounds to me like a problem with Firefox.
    This is a section from Slashdot:
    ---------------
    From the Department of Justice announcement:

    The ransomware informed victims that their computer was encrypted, and
    that they would need to purchase special software through a Bitcoin
    address controlled by the Trickbot Group to decrypt their files. In addition, Witte allegedly provided code to the Trickbot Group that
    monitored and tracked authorized users of the malware and developed
    tools and protocols to store stolen login credentials... Witte and her co-conspirators allegedly worked together to infect victim computers
    with the Trickbot malware designed to capture online banking login credentials and harvest other personal information, including credit
    card numbers, emails, passwords, dates of birth, social security numbers
    and addresses. Witte and others also allegedly captured login
    credentials and other stolen personal information to gain access to
    online bank accounts, execute unauthorized electronic funds transfers
    and launder the money through U.S. and foreign beneficiary accounts... ---------------

    The markup is not copied as usenet should not contain html
    Anything fancier would require PrtSc.

    In LO I also get the correct fonts.


    Thanks. Related to this displeasant info,
    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?



    --
    http://gamo.sdf-eu.org/
    perl -E 'say "Why cannibals don't eat coders? Bugs inside.";'
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 11:34:33 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    gamo wrote:
    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?

    What do you mean?

    Are you perhaps talking about the default file system check that
    requires a ctrl-C to abort? The memtest function at boot is not
    automatic but an option in the boot menu. Are you talking about
    something in grub?

    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 11:48:10 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    gamo wrote:
    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?

    I booted a live Ub 20.04.1 Mate. I see that it has memtest86+ installed
    by default. The description says:

    This tester runs independently of any OS - it is run at computer
    boot-up, so that it can test *all* of your memory. You may want to
    look at `memtester', which allows to test your memory within Linux,
    but this one won't be able to test your whole RAM.

    I'm not sure I follow/understand the full meaning of that description.

    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Aragorn@thorongil@telenet.be to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 21:36:47 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 06.06.2021 at 11:48, Mike Easter scribbled:
    gamo wrote:
    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?

    I booted a live Ub 20.04.1 Mate. I see that it has memtest86+
    installed by default. The description says:

    This tester runs independently of any OS - it is run at computer
    boot-up, so that it can test *all* of your memory. You may want to
    look at `memtester', which allows to test your memory within Linux,
    but this one won't be able to test your whole RAM.

    I'm not sure I follow/understand the full meaning of that description.
    The program called memtester runs as a process in an already running
    OS, and therefore it cannot access all of your RAM. Only the kernel
    can do that.
    memtest86+ is in essence a kernel. It boots as a kernel specifically
    geared towards testing the RAM. It does not run on top of anything but
    the hardware, and there isn't anything else running alongside it
    either. Therefore, given that it runs as a kernel — in ring 0 of the processor core — it can access and scan all of the available RAM
    without any interference or limitation by the memory page protection.
    It essentially uses your entire RAM as a single address space.
    --
    With respect,
    = Aragorn =
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Mike Easter@MikeE@ster.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 12:59:40 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Aragorn wrote:
    The program called memtester runs as a process in an already running
    OS, and therefore it cannot access all of your RAM. Only the kernel
    can do that.

    memtest86+ is in essence a kernel. It boots as a kernel specifically
    geared towards testing the RAM. It does not run on top of anything but
    the hardware, and there isn't anything else running alongside it
    either. Therefore, given that it runs as a kernel — in ring 0 of the processor core — it can access and scan all of the available RAM
    without any interference or limitation by the memory page protection.
    It essentially uses your entire RAM as a single address space.

    But...

    re gamo's query; I don't know of any memtest that runs by default when
    Ub 20.04 is booted, live, VM, or installed. In order to do a memtest
    'at boot' (ie prior to boot) one has to enable that option.

    Should I interpret his question:

    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?

    ... as the 'without' simply meaning 'uninstall a program which is
    installed by default, but which does NOT run by default at boot'.



    --
    Mike Easter
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Paul@nospam@needed.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 16:09:26 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Mike Easter wrote:
    gamo wrote:
    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?

    I booted a live Ub 20.04.1 Mate. I see that it has memtest86+ installed
    by default. The description says:

    This tester runs independently of any OS - it is run at computer
    boot-up, so that it can test *all* of your memory. You may want to
    look at `memtester', which allows to test your memory within Linux,
    but this one won't be able to test your whole RAM.

    I'm not sure I follow/understand the full meaning of that description.


    Running a memory tester in Linux, while the kernel runs.

    +-----------+
    | Test-able | \
    | | \
    | | \
    | | /
    | | /
    +-----------+ /
    | Kernel |
    | |
    | |
    +-----------+
    | BIOS E810 |
    +-----------+

    Running a memory tester as a bootable binary.

    +-----------+
    | Test-able | \
    | | \
    | | \
    | | \
    | | |--- Mostly testable
    | | /
    | | /
    | | /
    | code | /
    +-----------+
    | BIOS E810 | 1MB not covered
    +-----------+

    Note: The "code" hunk is moved out of the way,
    and the memory tester tests the area the code
    used to occupy. Later, the code is moved back.
    This means the "code load" area is tested!

    The BIOS E810 area is reserved for BIOS usage. If
    memtest were to work in there, all hell would break loose.
    This is one area that cannot be massaged with "move it out
    of the way" code. The machine can take an SMI for
    SMM (system management mode) at any time, while the
    memory test code is running. On an Asus motherboard,
    this could happen 30 times a second while the VCore
    phases are adjusted.

    *******

    How to *really* test memory 100%.

    It requires a four slot motherboard and two DIMMs.
    The "X" equals no DIMM. You put the two DIMMs on
    the same channel (single channel mode).

    Channel 0 Channel 1
    High X
    Low X

    If the test passes, you swap the DIMMs

    Channel 0 Channel 1
    Low X
    High X

    This solves the 1MB area at the bottom, but may
    not cover a few other spots. I would have to find
    an E810 description to get an exact inventory.

    I've only had one case, where the memory was bad
    in a "critical" location. Most other times, random
    chance favors the system coming up.

    I've had one chip on a DIMM fail and generate random
    byte values (likely the bus is floating). This means
    there are failure patterns other than a single
    stuck-at bit somewhere. Using the above single-channel
    test mode, one test case would not boot memtest, while
    the other would. The errors were just scrolling off
    the screen... :-) That was some Crucial Ballistix.

    Paul
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Aragorn@thorongil@telenet.be to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Mon Jun 7 02:30:10 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    On 06.06.2021 at 12:59, Mike Easter scribbled:
    Aragorn wrote:
    The program called memtester runs as a process in an already running
    OS, and therefore it cannot access all of your RAM. Only the kernel
    can do that.

    memtest86+ is in essence a kernel. It boots as a kernel
    specifically geared towards testing the RAM. It does not run on
    top of anything but the hardware, and there isn't anything else
    running alongside it either. Therefore, given that it runs as a
    kernel — in ring 0 of the processor core — it can access and scan
    all of the available RAM without any interference or limitation by
    the memory page protection. It essentially uses your entire RAM as
    a single address space.

    But...

    re gamo's query; I don't know of any memtest that runs by default
    when Ub 20.04 is booted, live, VM, or installed. In order to do a
    memtest 'at boot' (ie prior to boot) one has to enable that option.

    Should I interpret his question:

    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?

    ... as the 'without' simply meaning 'uninstall a program which is
    installed by default, but which does NOT run by default at boot'.
    To tell you the truth, his question didn't make any sense to me
    personally either.
    However, GRUB can remember the last-booted entry and use that as the
    default choice upon the next boot. I don't know whether Ubuntu
    configures GRUB that way out-of-the-box, but Manjaro and Arch do.
    If Ubuntu does that too, then it's possible that gamo's GRUB has stored memtest86+ as the default boot choice because he ran it once before.
    And then all he needs to do is boot another entry, and then that should
    become the default for the following boot.
    Of course, there's always the option of editing /etc/default/grub and
    disabling the option to save the last boot choice and make it the
    default, possibly even by hard-defining a default entry in the file.
    1. Change...
    GRUB_DEFAULT=saved
    GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT=true
    ... into
    GRUB_DEFAULT=a-number-here
    GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT=false
    ... whereby "a-number-here" corresponds to the number of the
    preferred default choice, starting from number "0" for the first
    entry.
    2. Run the command...
    $ sudo update-grub
    --
    With respect,
    = Aragorn =
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Paul@nospam@needed.invalid to alt.os.linux.ubuntu on Sun Jun 6 21:53:45 2021
    From Newsgroup: alt.os.linux.ubuntu

    Mike Easter wrote:
    Aragorn wrote:
    The program called memtester runs as a process in an already running
    OS, and therefore it cannot access all of your RAM. Only the kernel
    can do that.

    memtest86+ is in essence a kernel. It boots as a kernel specifically
    geared towards testing the RAM. It does not run on top of anything but
    the hardware, and there isn't anything else running alongside it
    either. Therefore, given that it runs as a kernel — in ring 0 of the
    processor core — it can access and scan all of the available RAM
    without any interference or limitation by the memory page protection.
    It essentially uses your entire RAM as a single address space.

    But...

    re gamo's query; I don't know of any memtest that runs by default when
    Ub 20.04 is booted, live, VM, or installed. In order to do a memtest
    'at boot' (ie prior to boot) one has to enable that option.

    Should I interpret his question:

    could I boot the computer without the memtest+ program?

    ... as the 'without' simply meaning 'uninstall a program which is
    installed by default, but which does NOT run by default at boot'.

    memtest+ is mutually exclusive of the kernel/OS booting.

    Nothing else runs while memtest runs.

    The memtest executable is small, and is the sole executable
    running at the time of the test. There is no tradition Linus Torvalds
    kernel or scheduler.

    Thus, the only impact of having a memtest+ capability, is
    an extra line somewhere in a boot menu choice. That's the
    only impact, a trivial cosmetic impact. It's not using
    resources.

    Paul
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113