• NOMADLAND (no spoilers)

    From moviePig@pwallace@moviepig.com to rec.arts.movies.current-films on Thu May 27 17:55:09 2021
    From Newsgroup: rec.arts.movies.current-films


    When corporate upheaval blights her hometown, a woman (Frances
    McDormand) retreats to a road-bound existence, where she discovers a
    whole sub-culture of similarly engaged citizens. Although NOMADLAND,
    which won Best-Picture, felt to this sybaritic viewer like a cross
    between a documentary and a sermon, it was an easy enough cross to bear,
    owing principally to McDormand's tacit assurance that here is a world
    worth knowing about. Intelligent, and mostly recommended.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From moviePig@pwallace@moviepig.com to rec.arts.movies.current-films on Fri May 28 10:41:07 2021
    From Newsgroup: rec.arts.movies.current-films

    On 5/28/2021 8:02 AM, trotsky wrote:
    On 5/27/21 4:55 PM, moviePig wrote:

    When corporate upheaval blights her hometown, a woman (Frances
    McDormand) retreats to a road-bound existence, where she discovers a
    whole sub-culture of similarly engaged citizens.  Although NOMADLAND,
    which won Best-Picture, felt to this sybaritic viewer like a cross
    between a documentary and a sermon, it was an easy enough cross to
    bear, owing principally to McDormand's tacit assurance that here is a
    world worth knowing about.  Intelligent, and mostly recommended.

    You are really good at missing the point, dude.  It *is* didactic, in
    that it shows categorically that people don't have to have a fixed
    address to be respectable and likable people.  By not understanding or obscuring this message you essentially are defecating on the film.  Oh,
    and the directing was superb.

    I take the point, but I'm trying here to give my reaction as a
    movie-consumer ...or, at least, as a somewhat self-absorbed movie
    consumer. And, while I agree that the movie credibly raises awareness,
    I'm less sure that most of us will find its reveals truly astonishing
    ...and, particularly in an "informative" movie, astonishment often
    translates into entertainment. Still, yes, its craftsmanship and
    commitment were solid, and I don't even begrudge it its B.P. Oscar...

    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From william ahearn@wlahearn@gmail.com to rec.arts.movies.current-films on Fri May 28 10:14:27 2021
    From Newsgroup: rec.arts.movies.current-films

    On Friday, May 28, 2021 at 8:02:52 AM UTC-4, gmsin...@gmail.com wrote:
    On 5/27/21 4:55 PM, moviePig wrote:
    Oh,
    and the directing was superb.

    Her first two films were way better.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From RichA@rander3128@gmail.com to rec.arts.movies.current-films on Wed Jun 2 18:46:30 2021
    From Newsgroup: rec.arts.movies.current-films

    On Thursday, 27 May 2021 at 17:55:13 UTC-4, pwal...@moviepig.com wrote:
    When corporate upheaval blights her hometown, a woman (Frances
    McDormand) retreats to a road-bound existence, where she discovers a
    whole sub-culture of similarly engaged citizens. Although NOMADLAND,
    which won Best-Picture, felt to this sybaritic viewer like a cross
    between a documentary and a sermon, it was an easy enough cross to bear, owing principally to McDormand's tacit assurance that here is a world
    worth knowing about. Intelligent, and mostly recommended.
    Description: (IMDB):
    A woman in her sixties, after losing everything in the Great Recession, embarks on a journey through the American West, living as a van-dwelling modern-day nomad.
    If any movie is capable of offering a rational explanation as to HOW Americans in movies, dead-broke, can afford to run any vehicle at length, I'd like to see it. Insurance, gas, repairs, the need to eat, wash, etc.. People who roam America are usually well-heeled boomers in $100,000+ trailers.
    --- Synchronet 3.18a-Linux NewsLink 1.113